Monday, February 6, 2023


The gadgetry at the CES show in Las Vegas – including charming companion robots and comfortable headsets – is a nod to the ever-changing technology landscape in K-12 education.

Schools once tiptoeing toward adoption began a sprint at the onset of the pandemic. And even though remote learning has faded somewhat, the technology conversation has intensified. 

Why We Wrote This

How close are we to having technology that could reimagine the way learning is accomplished? The Monitor’s K-12 education reporter visited the recent CES show to see how the gadgetry on display and educator needs match up.

Teachers aren’t just grappling with how and when to embrace digital learning methods. They’re also eyeing innovations in artificial intelligence. Last week, the New York City Department of Education blocked access on district networks and devices to ChatGPT, a new AI-enabled program.

And if a stroll through CES – held Jan. 5-8 – is any indication, the disruptions will continue in big and small ways. Roybi Inc. debuted its RoybiVerse, which the company describes as an “intelligent edutainment metaverse.” “Immersive education is the future of learning,” says Elnaz Sarraf, Roybi CEO, in an email.

Despite concerns about tools like ChatGPT writing students’ essays, Lindy Hockenbary, a teacher-turned-ed-tech consultant, says there’s also room for hope. “It’s disruptive to the way we do formal education now,” she says. “But the other part of it – and where it can truly transform education – is it does have the power to help with personalized learning.”

It’s hard not to smile back at Buddy.

He’s sitting on the convention floor at CES, the large technology conference formerly known as the Consumer Electronic Show, in Las Vegas. His white body rotates and his head swivels, but it’s his emotive face that melts hearts. The robot smiles, frowns, blinks, and even tears up – digitally, of course.

His Paris-based creator, Blue Frog Robotics, bills him as an “emotional companion” that can solve problems faced by education systems. 

Why We Wrote This

How close are we to having technology that could reimagine the way learning is accomplished? The Monitor’s K-12 education reporter visited the recent CES show to see how the gadgetry on display and educator needs match up.

For example, Buddy sits on desks and becomes a homebound or hospitalized child’s avatar, providing the classroom experience in a more natural way. Last year, France’s Ministry of Education ordered roughly 2,000 of the artificial intelligence-enhanced robots for that purpose, says Maud Verraes, the Paris-based company’s chief marketing officer. 

“There’s a big need, and it’s the same everywhere,” Ms. Verraes says of using the robot to give children a virtual presence in classrooms. 



Source link

0 Comments

Leave a Comment

This is a Sidebar position. Add your widgets in this position using Default Sidebar or a custom sidebar.